Ask a question   Submit to WiseLatinas   a guide by, for, and about college Latinas hit counter

Border of Lights →

caribbeansoup:

October 2012 marks the 75 anniversary of the 1937 Haitian Massacre where thousands of Haitians and their Dominican-born descendants were murdered in what the US Ambassador in Santo Domingo, R. Henry Norweb, described as “a systematic campaign of extermination.”

A group of artists, activists, students, teachers and parents have come together to breathe life to a tragedy long forgotten, for some, a tragedy they never knew took place.

Border of Lights is a collective coming together to commemorate, collaborate and continue the legacy of hope and justice.

— 1 year ago with 1 note

empoweredafrolatina:

tierracita:

buttahlove:

pearmama:

alamaquina:

GORDITA

“Gordita is a short film about a young, plus size Latina who reconnects with her lost confidence through the help of a cassette tape she recorded as a sassy, booty-shakin’ teen in 1994.

We all have moments of self doubt and depression, but sometimes remembering who we were before the pressures of adulthood consumed us helps us get out of our funk and realize our full potential.”

Man, I’ve been looking for this all frickin’ day!!

Enjoy, Tumblit@s! This is an amazing short. ♡


Awww, love.

My favorite part is when she caressed her younger-self.


Haven’t seen it yet but I know I’m going to love it.

Eta: watched it and loved it:)

Perfect!

(Source: a-la-maquina)

— 1 year ago with 997 notes
"Chican@ is about many things. Most you cannot define. But to me, chican@ is about both reclamation and identification. Chican@ is decolonizing the restraints put on us the second we were born brown and American. My family did not cross your borders, America. They barreled through them. My family did not live here. They survived here. And though they may have conformed to do that, it takes but a second, or a conversation. or a plate of food, to unravel that."

The Untitled Mag » an open letter to those who doubt the power of chican@s

Rising from internalized hatred into empowerment and pride. Aiden’s realization of a Chican@ identity.

(via theuntitledmag)

(via theuntitledmag)

— 1 year ago with 157 notes
latinageek:

Afro-Latina women relate their personal stories and advocacy for racial equality“My housewife mother turned into a raging warrior woman when the principal of my elementary school questioned whether her daughter and the children of my public school had the intelligence to pass a citywide test,” Marta Moreno Vega writes in her essay.  She knew then she was loved and valued, and she learned that to be an Afro-Puerto Rican woman meant activism was her birth right.Hers is one of eleven essays and four poems included in this volume in which Latina women of African descent share their stories. The authors included are from all over Latin America—Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Panama, Puerto Rico and Venezuela—and they write about the African diaspora and issues such as colonialism, oppression and disenfranchisement. Diva Moreira, a black Brazilian, writes that she experienced racism and humiliation at a very young age. The worst experience, she remembers, was when her mother’s bosses told her she didn’t need to go to school after the fourth grade, “because blacks don’t need to study more than that.”The contributors span a range of professions, from artists to grass-roots activists, scholars and elected officials. Each is deeply engaged in her community, and they all use their positions to advocate for justice, racial equality and cultural equity. In their introduction, the editors write that these stories provide insight into the conditions that have led Afro-Latinas to challenge systems of inequality, including the machismo that is still prominent in Spanish-speaking cultures.A fascinating look at the legacy of more than 400 years of African enslavement in the Americas, this collection of personal stories is a must-read for anyone interested in the African diaspora and issues of inequality and racism.

latinageek:

Afro-Latina women relate their personal stories and advocacy for racial equality

“My housewife mother turned into a raging warrior woman when the principal of my elementary school questioned whether her daughter and the children of my public school had the intelligence to pass a citywide test,” Marta Moreno Vega writes in her essay.  She knew then she was loved and valued, and she learned that to be an Afro-Puerto Rican woman meant activism was her birth right.

Hers is one of eleven essays and four poems included in this volume in which Latina women of African descent share their stories. The authors included are from all over Latin America—Brazil, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Panama, Puerto Rico and Venezuela—and they write about the African diaspora and issues such as colonialism, oppression and disenfranchisement. Diva Moreira, a black Brazilian, writes that she experienced racism and humiliation at a very young age. The worst experience, she remembers, was when her mother’s bosses told her she didn’t need to go to school after the fourth grade, “because blacks don’t need to study more than that.”

The contributors span a range of professions, from artists to grass-roots activists, scholars and elected officials. Each is deeply engaged in her community, and they all use their positions to advocate for justice, racial equality and cultural equity. In their introduction, the editors write that these stories provide insight into the conditions that have led Afro-Latinas to challenge systems of inequality, including the machismo that is still prominent in Spanish-speaking cultures.

A fascinating look at the legacy of more than 400 years of African enslavement in the Americas, this collection of personal stories is a must-read for anyone interested in the African diaspora and issues of inequality and racism.

(via theuntitledmag)

— 1 year ago with 1578 notes
blackacrylic:

Grandmother in Havana, Cuba.
Like a G6.

blackacrylic:

Grandmother in Havana, Cuba.

Like a G6.

(via lati-negros)

— 1 year ago with 9615 notes
This is whatup: basedjaysuave: You can very easily be African American and... →

empoweredafrolatina:

searchingforknowledge:

basedjaysuave:

latinagabi:

basedjaysuave:

You can very easily be African American and Latino/Latina but you don’t get that title without actually being black.

You also are not given that title just because you’re a brown skinned Hispanic person.

Show. Me. The. Receipts.

I’m only part Afro-Latina, so this is a…

My issue is lack of receipts.

What information outside of her skin color is there that she’s not just Latina or even identifies herself as a black Latina woman? Is there a family tree? Interview? Something solid?

That’s all I want.

Google is your friend: http://lovemyblack.com/zoe-saldana-get-it-straight-i-am-a-black-woman/

Also. HER DAMN SKIN COLOR IDENTIFIES HER AS A GODDAMN BLACK WOMAN. Who the fuck are YOU to be policing blackness?!

Lawd. When will this STUPID “debate” be over? It’s not even up for discussion in my book actually. AfroAmericans/Black Americans you are not the only people of African descent in the world, you don’t get to police anyone’s identity. You were the least of the slave trade. If you want to talk about African Diaspora and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, it actually started OUTSIDE of the U.S. Get a damn book, read up and then get over it. Enough of ya’ll.

(Source: kingofthesorrypeoples)

— 1 year ago with 69 notes

latinegrasexologist:

shared and fell in love w/this video oct 2010, it’s still great. Tomboy: A Video About Latin@s, Gender Identity & Bullying by Barb Taylor

i love how the characters are LatiNegras, the princess Black, etc.

(via lati-negros)

— 1 year ago with 245 notes
meredith-stern:


Melanie Cervantes is a Xicana activist-artist who believes art is best when developed collaboratively and co-founded Dignidad Rebelde to address this value. Emerging from the everyday struggles of Third World and Indigenous peoples, Dignidad Rebelde produces art intended to transform people’s stories into a radical visual language which is then returned to those who initially inspired it.

meredith-stern:

Melanie Cervantes is a Xicana activist-artist who believes art is best when developed collaboratively and co-founded Dignidad Rebelde to address this value. Emerging from the everyday struggles of Third World and Indigenous peoples, Dignidad Rebelde produces art intended to transform people’s stories into a radical visual language which is then returned to those who initially inspired it.

(via lati-negros)

— 1 year ago with 282 notes
samirathejerk:

untitled-mag:

Sandy also struck CUBA, JAMAICA, HAITI and THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. Our hearts are with all who are impacted by this international tragedy.
To date, Sandy has impacted an estimated 60 million people. The storm caused at least 52 deaths in Haiti, as well as flooding and extensive damage across the island nation, where 370,000 people still live in flimsy shelter and tent camps following the 2010 earthquake. More than 200,000 people were left homeless by the storm, which damaged 84 displacement camps.
In the South and Southwest departments, roads are destroyed, bridges have been swept away and the main hospital in Les Cayes remains flooded. The Gray River, located on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince in the West department, overflowed taking away homes and businesses. The main road linking Haiti to the Dominican Republic is also badly damaged, making it difficult for vehicles to cross the border.

People have completely overlooked what happened in this countries.

samirathejerk:

untitled-mag:

Sandy also struck CUBA, JAMAICA, HAITI and THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. 
Our hearts are with all who are impacted by this international tragedy.

To date, Sandy has impacted an estimated 60 million people. The storm caused at least 52 deaths in Haiti, as well as flooding and extensive damage across the island nation, where 370,000 people still live in flimsy shelter and tent camps following the 2010 earthquake. More than 200,000 people were left homeless by the storm, which damaged 84 displacement camps.

In the South and Southwest departments, roads are destroyed, bridges have been swept away and the main hospital in Les Cayes remains flooded. The Gray River, located on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince in the West department, overflowed taking away homes and businesses. The main road linking Haiti to the Dominican Republic is also badly damaged, making it difficult for vehicles to cross the border.

People have completely overlooked what happened in this countries.

(Source: titotansey, via lati-negros)

— 1 year ago with 2050 notes